Take a Step Back in Time

"HISTORY IS NOT JUST FOUND IN TEXTBOOKS. IT IS THE FOUNDATION OF EVERYTHING WE KNOW." - VICTORIA BROWN

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Lady Godiva was an eleventh century Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to a legend dating back at least to the thirteenth century, rode naked through the streets of Coventry in order to gain a remission of the oppressive taxation imposed by her husband on his tenants. 

Lady Godiva was an eleventh century Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to a legend dating back at least to the thirteenth century, rode naked through the streets of Coventry in order to gain a remission of the oppressive taxation imposed by her husband on his tenants. 

Filed under History Lady Godiva Anglo-Saxon Legend Medieval

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Bonnie Elizabeth Parker and Clyde Chestnut Barrow were American outlaws, robbers, and criminals who travelled the Central United States with their gang during the Great Depression. Their exploits captured the attention of the American public during the “public enemy era" between 1931 and 1934. Though known today for his dozen-or-so bank robberies, Barrow in fact preferred to rob small stores or rural gas stations. The gang is believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple themselves were eventually ambushed and killed in North Louisiana by law officers.

Bonnie Elizabeth Parker and Clyde Chestnut Barrow were American outlaws, robbers, and criminals who travelled the Central United States with their gang during the Great DepressionTheir exploits captured the attention of the American public during the “public enemy era" between 1931 and 1934. Though known today for his dozen-or-so bank robberies, Barrow in fact preferred to rob small stores or rural gas stations. The gang is believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple themselves were eventually ambushed and killed in North Louisiana by law officers.

Filed under History Bonnie and Clyde American History

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The Lady of Shalott is an 1888 oil-on-canvas painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. It is a representation of a scene from Lord Tennyson's 1832 poem, Alfred, in which the poet describes the plight of a young woman, loosely based on Elaine of Astolat, who yearned with an unrequited love for the knight Sir Lancelot, isolated under an undisclosed curse in a tower near King Arthur's Camelot. 

The Lady of Shalott is an 1888 oil-on-canvas painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. It is a representation of a scene from Lord Tennyson's 1832 poem, Alfred, in which the poet describes the plight of a young woman, loosely based on Elaine of Astolat, who yearned with an unrequited love for the knight Sir Lancelot, isolated under an undisclosed curse in a tower near King Arthur's Camelot

Filed under History The Lady of Shalott Pre Raphaelite John William Waterhouse

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Attributed to high-ranking military general, strategist and tactician Sun Tzu, The Art of War is an ancient Chinese military treatise. The text is composed of thirteen chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare. It is commonly known to be the definitive work on military strategy and tactics of its time and has been the most famous and influential of China’s Seven Military Classics. For the last two millennia it has remained the most important military treatise in Asia, where even the common people knew it by name. It has had an influence on Eastern and Western military thinking, business tactics, legal strategy and beyond.

Attributed to high-ranking military general, strategist and tactician Sun Tzu, The Art of War is an ancient Chinese military treatise. The text is composed of thirteen chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare. It is commonly known to be the definitive work on military strategy and tactics of its time and has been the most famous and influential of China’s Seven Military Classics. For the last two millennia it has remained the most important military treatise in Asia, where even the common people knew it by name. It has had an influence on Eastern and Western military thinking, business tactics, legal strategy and beyond.

Filed under History The Art of War Sun Tzu Chinese History

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In Stone Age cultures Obsidian was highly valued as, similar to flint, it could be fractured to produce sharp blades and arrowheads. It breaks with a characteristic conchoidal fracture, meaning it does not follow natural planes of separation. It was also polished to create early mirrors.

In Stone Age cultures Obsidian was highly valued as, similar to flint, it could be fractured to produce sharp blades and arrowheads. It breaks with a characteristic conchoidal fracture, meaning it does not follow natural planes of separation. It was also polished to create early mirrors.

Filed under History Obsidian

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In Greek mythology, Helios was the personification of the Sun. Homer frequently refers to him as Titan or Hyperion, whilst Hesiod and the Homeric Hymn separate him as a son of the Titans Hyperion and Theia (Hesiod) or Euryphaessa (Homeric Hymn), as well as brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn.

In Greek mythology, Helios was the personification of the SunHomer frequently refers to him as Titan or Hyperion, whilst Hesiod and the Homeric Hymn separate him as a son of the Titans Hyperion and Theia (Hesiod) or Euryphaessa (Homeric Hymn), as well as brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn.

Filed under History Ancient History Ancient Greece Helios

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St John’s College, Cambridge, was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII, in 1511. It was founded on the site of a thirteenth century Hospital of St John and, largely thanks to the efforts of Saint John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester following Lady Margaret’s death, the college received approval of Henry VIII, the Pope and the Bishop of Ely. Over the course of the following five hundred years, the College expanded westwards towards the River Cam, and now has eleven courts, the most of any Oxford or Cambridge College. Women were first admitted into the college in 1981.

St John’s College, Cambridge, was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII, in 1511. It was founded on the site of a thirteenth century Hospital of St John and, largely thanks to the efforts of Saint John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester following Lady Margaret’s death, the college received approval of Henry VIII, the Pope and the Bishop of Ely. Over the course of the following five hundred years, the College expanded westwards towards the River Cam, and now has eleven courts, the most of any Oxford or Cambridge College. Women were first admitted into the college in 1981.

Filed under History St John's College Cambridge Tudor

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I can only note that the past is beautiful because one never realises an emotion at the time. It expands later, and thus we don’t have complete emotions about the present, only about the past.
Virginia Woolf

Filed under Virginia Woolf History Quote